A 9/11 Round-Up: Please share links in comments, too

Saturday, September 10th, 2011

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I just put up my post about 9/11. It’s not exactly sunshine and daisies. Anyway, I’m posting other reactions here, too:

The sun rises — Picture of the 9/11 memorial this morning.

MUST READ: Raina Williams — Round Numbers Don’t Mean Anything

Reuters — Slideshow of pictures.

Wall Street Journal — Round up. Worth a look.

Erick Erickson — In memoriam. All the names.

Michelle Malkin — All the wrong 9/11 lessons

Peggy Noonan — We’ll never get over it

Israelly Cool — 9/11 Ten Years On (good videos)

Washington Post — F16 pilot willing to give her life on 9/11

Hugh Hewitt — President Bush’s moving tribute to Flight 93.

Gatewaypundit — Mayor Bloomberg dissing the clergy and first responders

Mark Steyn — “Let’s roll over” [Must read.]

Kerry Picket — “It’s insanity all over the city.

Blazing Cat Fur — Until tomorrow.

The Other McCain — On September 10th.

Cracked — 4 Reasons we need to start making fun of the terrorists.

Maggie’s Farm — Son made video for 6th grade classmates. Never forget.

Brendan Loy — Video of patriotism with audio from great American leaders’ speeches.

Yid With Lid — I remember, but too many forget.

Rick Reilly — A tribut to Flight 93: Let’s keep rolling.

Instapundit — A blog revolution begins.

The Telegraph, Toby Harden — Washington D.C., the other city attacked.

The Blaze — Celebrating the terrorists in art. In Germany.

Breitbart — President Clinton’s tribute to Flight 93 heroes.

Marathon Pundit — A time to celebrate.

Midnight Blue — Honoring soldiers.

Girl on the Right — Keeping the vigil.

Thoughtful Conservative — Identifying the Dead.

Chicago Sun Times — A survivor’s perspective: “I’ve already had the worst day.”

Carrie Underwood — National Anthem

Alexa Shrugged — I am overcome.

Bryan Myrick — For out enemies, the target will always be us.

Letters from Glome — A mighty fortress is our God.

Smitty, from Afghanistan — Arguably the best thing written on 9/11.

Warner Todd Huston — 9/11 Still infuriates.

Dan Spencer — A day for remembering.

Dan Spencer — A space commander remembers 9/11.

Viral Footage — Various videos to remember 9/11.

Karol Markowitz — We’re free, even to be over 9/11.

The Jersey-Texan — Never quit.

Pat Gohn — 9/11 and the ever-present Christ.

Pirates Cove — Another wrap-up.

Andrew Malcolm — Most Americans expect it again.

Lilac Sunday — I remember everything.

Mike Chamberlain — Never forget.

The Anchoress — Another link around. Also note, “The forgiveness gene.”

Father Robert Barron — Why we should forgive.

Chris Hitchens — Pure Evil.

Stephen Green — A look back.

Marco Rubio — Remembering 9/11.

Bookworm Room — I remember. (Pictures.)

James Taranto — Too soon to forget?

Michael Gershon — The Ugly Gash of 9/11

Don Surber — We shall fear no evil.

Seth Mandel — Why we won’t forget Giuliani’s leadership.

Michelle Malkin — The Littlest victims. Remembering the children who died on 9/11.

John and Joe — A firefighter father remembers his son .

Examiner — Lawsuit by 9/11 victims against Iran.

Lileks — The end of the world.

A Tribute — Watch it.

John Derbyshire — Barbarism v. Civilization via @Instapundit who has more



9/11: No, America Is Not Over It Yet

Saturday, September 10th, 2011

NOTE: I am doing a separate 9/11 link round-up. There are many great personal stories, tributes, etc. Very worth spending some time reading them.

When one endures a great tragedy — death of a child, loss of a limb in war; or experiences a violation — rape, affair, house burglary– people find a million different ways to ask the victims without actually saying the words, “Are you over it?”The question is profoundly offensive no matter how it’s asked.

A person never gets over some things. He learns to live with it.

Around the corners of the body, house, the town, the life, there are memories. The realness of the memories will shock at surprising and unwelcome times. And no matter how profoundly it’s desired, there will be no forgetting.

9/11.

Hey, America! You over it yet?

New York city is the shining, favored daughter. She is beautiful and busy and idealistic and innocent and open and hopeful. In her, people, people less talented, less lovely, cast their hopes.

America is America the beautiful. She has her faults, to be sure, but one of them isn’t cynicism. Buoyed by a sunny disposition and the opportunity for renewal, America shines.

New York city is the best of all that. New York is the creative spirit. New York is renewal.

New York city is life.

Sound romantic? Absolutely. And it’s that romance and idealism, that essence of America, that Osama bin Laden saw and wanted to destroy.

I was taking my son to his first day of preschool and heard that the first Tower had been hit. What should I do? It seemed evident to me that this was no accident.

Immediately, my thoughts turned to Israel. They get these attacks all the time. They don’t stop. They keep going.

And then a string of New York acquired expletives flashed through my mind. My son would stay at school. %!@!. Them.

My baby daughter was at my mom’s house. As I walked through the door, I saw the second tower hit and I crumpled.

All those people.

I watched the horror unfold like the majority of my mesmerized compatriots. People jumped from the blast furnace of twisted metal rather than be consumed.

I watched, wondering what happened to Flight 93. Wondering if one of our F16 pilots had to pull that trigger. Horrified at the possibility. Knowing there was only one choice and being sick because of it.

I watched the Pentagon burn. Fearing for the President. Fearing for the White House.

As I watched, I pushed back the fear. I hated being afraid and became very angry. Very, very angry.

I wanted vengeance. I still do. I am disappointed that a bullet from my gun didn’t kill Osama bin Laden. It gives me some small satisfaction that one of our Navy Seals, badasses that they are, received this fine honor. I’m sorry Osama bin Laden can’t be killed again. And again.

This reaction isn’t politically correct, mind you. I recognize that.

It’s not politically correct that I want every single one of those people who laughed at our demise to feel the pain and violation we felt on that brilliant September morning ten years ago.

It’s not politically correct that I believe that people who excuse or justify this behavior are as bad as the perpetrators of the assault.

It’s not politically correct that I have contempt for the uncivilized, backward well of ideological despair that gave rise to these actions.

The rationale for terrorism is the rationale of the serial killer. There is a bleakness and blackness of soul so vast that the only thing that animates his nihilistic life is the death of those who love what he doesn’t–life, love, possibility.

The moral equivalence I see in the face of this depravity makes me sick. It is absolutely disgusting that people can justify or equivocate in the face of such evil.

America, her freedom, creativity, her love of life and liberty, her success, her innocence got attacked on 9/11. The smoldering holes at the Twin Towers are a testament to the greatness our enemies wish to destroy.

And there are some who believe she deserved it. She had it coming. She dressed provocatively. She is more beautiful. She swayed when she walked. She has a bigger house. She has been given everything on a silver platter. She’s greedy. She’s pushy. She’s a whore.

These are all the justifications of the killer, the thief, the rapist, the terrorist, the nihilist, the Nazi.

And there is no rationalization that doesn’t make a sympathizer to this corruption the equivalent of the getaway driver at a bank robbery.

This was built.

And this was destroyed.

The scars from this attack will never go away. America will never be “over it.”

Every TSA feel-up is a reminder. Every bombing in London or Spain or India is a reminder. Every attack at Ft. Hood or on a recruiting center in Arkansas or in Time’s Square or on a flight to Detroit is a reminder.

America, because she is a shining city on a hill, because she reaches so high into the sky, is a target for hate. In a world full of darkness, many want light snuffed out.

So a decade post-9/11, I remember and I am scandalized all over again.

I am not “over it”.

I remember. I remember who did this.

I remember those who died as innocents. I remember those who tried to save the lives of those trapped  and lost their own. I remember those on Flight 93 who forfeited their own lives for their fellow Americans. I remember those who died at the Pentagon.

I remember those who  planned for a long, hard war against a pitiless enemy. I remember the National Guard pilots faced with a suicidal choice. I remember our military and our police and our firefighters and our first responders and those quiet DHS, NSA, CIA and FBI nerds combing through mountains of data for that needle of information to prevent another attack.

I remember our Marines and our Navy and our Army and our National Guard troops who have been asked to serve again and again–who put themselves in grave danger every day hunting the vermin who rejoice at using a dull knife to decapitate an innocent.

I remember as many details as I can. It is the least I can do.

I will never forget. And neither should you.



In Memorium: Angela Susan Perez, 9/11 Victim

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

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Eight years have passed since Al Qaeda terrorists used airplanes as weapons of mass destruction. Nearly 3,000 people died at the Twin Towers in New York City. Angela Susan Perez was one of those people.

Angela was the “cool aunt and baby sister.” She was a mother of three. Last year, her son wrote this:

Mom, I miss you so much. My graduation is just around the corner, and it’s going to be tough to walk down that aisle without you in the crowd, but I know you’ll be watching me. You will always be in my heart. Love u an’ miss u.

*** Posted by your little boy all grown up on 2008-02-28 ***

Angela was a best friend:

6 years later … the tears still flow … missing you never gets easier … cherished friend forever … few friends leave such an impression … you are truly one of the best friends I ever had! You will never be one of many victims to me … that day was one of the worst days for our country, a tragedy for New York, but it was the day that my best friend’s passing left a pain in my heart that will never go away…. Susan, I will always miss you and love you…. Keep laughing, my friend…. It’s smiles like yours that make the world go around…. May god walk beside you for eternity….

Love ya lots, girl,
Anna

She was 35. She was living her life, doing her job, raising her children, being a friend. Her life mattered. She deserves to be remembered and honored.

Angela Perez worked for Cantor Fitzgerald. Here is what Wikipedia says about the fate of those in the towers on that day:

Cantor Fitzgerald’s New York City office, on the 101st-105th floors of One World Trade Center (2-6 floors above the impact zone of a hijacked airliner), was destroyed during the September 11, 2001 attacks. Cantor Fitzgerald lost 658 employees (all of the employees in the office that day), or about two-thirds of its workforce, considerably more than any other of the World Trade Center tenants or the New York City Police Department and New York City Fire Department. The company was able to bring its trading markets back online within a week, and CEO and chairman Howard Lutnick, whose brother was among those killed, vowed to keep the company alive.

On September 19, Cantor Fitzgerald made a pledge to distribute 25 percent of the firm’s profits for the next five years, and committed to paying for ten years of health care, for the benefit of the families of its 658 former Cantor Fitzgerald, eSpeed, and TradeSpark employees (profits which would otherwise have been distributed to the Cantor Fitzgerald partners).[citation needed] In 2006 the company completed its promise, having paid a total of $180 million (and an additional $17 million from a relief fund run by Lutnick’s sister, Edie).[citation needed]

Time goes by, memories, especially bad memories, get shelved and put away. But for some people, they cannot forget their loss. Nor do they want to. For families and friends of those lost on 9/11, forgetting is more awful than remembering. And so they look at the picture, they see the holes where the buildings were and they remember. They get married and their mother cannot see the day of joy. They have children who have no grandma. They need a shoulder to cry on, but mom is gone.

Angela Susan Perez, like the hundreds with her in the top of that Tower, were innocent. They were walking, not fully realized, potential. They had a future that was taken away through no fault of their own.

On this day, it’s a privilege to honor Angela Perez. Her life mattered. It still matters. She leaves a legacy of family and friends who love and miss her. Thank you for honoring the lost by remembering. It’s the least we can do.

More.

Dale Challener Roe: The 2996 Project