Miserable Motherhood

September 2, 2014 / 11:56 pm • By Dr. Melissa Clouthier

drago

Motherhood is like Ivan Drago, it will break you, if you let it. Mouthy kids, messy house, everybody obstinate, demands unending, crying, whining, clinging, pestering, need, need, need. It is utterly exhausting.

Louis CK has a great bit called, “Why?” It about sums up what parenthood can do to you.

(Start at the 6:25 mark.)

I share all this because I read via a friend’s Facebook feed this mom’s lament about a truly crappy morning with her darling angels:

I lost it this morning. Really lost it. After the kids were all dressed for school, breakfast eaten, teeth brushed, backpacks packed, I turned on the TV. I have a rule that the kids can only watch certain channels. Annabelle never, ever, ever sticks to this rule.

You can go read the rest to see how she proceeded to handle Annabelle. Let’s just say this, at least mom didn’t let the disobedience stand.

This mother is worried about people judging. Maybe some non-parent is going to judge, but most parents are nothing if not utterly humbled. Kids will do that to you. I’m convinced that it starts with pregnancy and the uncontrolled, public fart that happens at least once. A parent is not a parent if he or she hasn’t lost his or her dignity. Sometimes, it’s lost and never returns. And this is with normal, regular old kids.

In addition to my “normal” children, I also have an autistic child in the mix. Having a special needs kid sent me to the books. I needed help.

Through my desperate searching, I did find one gem. There is a great book for parents struggling with disrespectful, entitled brats. I wish I had bought and read and implemented the principles years ago, but I was so buried and overwhelmed back then and no one told me. So, I’m telling you.

Read this book. When things start spinning out of control again, read it again. Lock yourself in the bathroom (yes, I still do that and no, it still doesn’t work) and refresh yourself with the principles.

For me, the maddening parenting thing is making the same request over and over and having gifted and talented children looking at me slack-jawed and drooling and acting as though I’ve just spoken in an obscure Chinese dialect. Oh, you know The Look. We all know The Look. This book will help you with that look.

Have a New Kid by Friday: How to Change Your Child’s Attitude, Behavior & Character in 5 Days